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DetectingScotland.com - Metal Detecting in Scotland, UK » Forum » Detecting Discussions » Detector Finds » ...a Scottish Viking in National Geographic

Author Topic: ...a Scottish Viking in National Geographic  (Read 2966 times)

Uncle Bob

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Re: ...a Scottish Viking in National Geographic
« Reply #15 on: March 24, 2016, 04:41:43 PM »
Good Nat Geo article, even if there are errors in it. Better than the usual bite sized national press efforts and gives enough info to raise the excitement level a couple of thousand notches!

It must be great for you to begin to see the daylight and take some of the wraps off...

Fabulous.

Bob.


macca

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Re: ...a Scottish Viking in National Geographic
« Reply #16 on: March 24, 2016, 05:45:29 PM »
Simply stunning

woodwynd

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Re: ...a Scottish Viking in National Geographic
« Reply #17 on: March 24, 2016, 06:23:08 PM »
pok3rman i agree with the guys no words to describe how you must have felt and feel , probably still hasn't sunk in yet, life changing and i dont mean the reward, finding this is better than any reward, you cant buy this, well done 8) 8) 8) 8) 8) 8) 8) 8) 8).
whenever i complained about an ailment growing up my mother used to say "if it's no yer erse it's yer elba" theres compassion for you! ;D ;D
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techdoc

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Re: ...a Scottish Viking in National Geographic
« Reply #18 on: March 24, 2016, 08:48:12 PM »
Absolutely fantastic achievement Derek, well done to you sir and the misses...such a wonderful find of a life time  ;) :)
Nothing of interest so far...2016 there again not been out much...;)

Haggy

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Re: ...a Scottish Viking in National Geographic
« Reply #19 on: March 24, 2016, 09:48:56 PM »
Words can't describe the beauty of these items, will be at the start of the queues when these go on display. Well done to Derek and pals.
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Bounty Hunter

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Re: ...a Scottish Viking in National Geographic
« Reply #20 on: March 26, 2016, 07:26:33 PM »
Like Big Allan ,Derek I don't know what words to even type to express my overwhelming delight and complete amazement at you remarkable finds. I watched Digging For Britain with my wife and family in a caravan at Wemyss Bay , my kids were also all amazed at the find. I like many of the rest of us on here feel that you yourself deserve some kind of national and international award and elevated recognition for discovering such a history changing collection of artifacts, as there value to Scotland and the rest of the world will never be truly measured in any academic historical or cultural sense as facts and theories gleaned from such a valuable source of reference will potentially impact on international theories and even ideologies regarding Viking culture for many many years to come. Your find shall also illuminate new understandings on Viking culture and trade movements for young children at Primary school to Post Grad Masters students young and old alike all over the world and I'm sure will be the subject matter for many dissertations and thesis from now until eternity.  The best part is it will be your name that will be written alongside our great countries name 'Scotland'. My wife like me also felt that the hoard should have been called 'The McLennan Hoard'. I have congratulated you many times and for what its worth Derek I for us all will do it again, Well done Big Man your a living legend now and we can all only aspire to ever replicate your achievements which of course is now impossible.
BW Ger aka Bounty Hunter.
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P0k3Rman

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Re: ...a Scottish Viking in National Geographic
« Reply #21 on: March 26, 2016, 09:48:18 PM »
...thanks for all the comments lads and lassies, it is very much appreciated. As far as any award from the establishment,  I would not say no to this, as it would be nice to actually be recognised for my many months of research, searching, identification and reporting.

...however, it appears that in Scotland and the politics involved in our country expecially within the TT system, it is just 'not done' to mention that it was found by a competent and well read metal detectorist.

...this is the ONLY major hoard not to have been dug by the detectorist who found it, excepting the first couple of pieces. It was the first in modern times to be excavated by an archaeologist, albeit his 'colleagues' who assisted were five metal detectorists. All other major hoards have been fully dug by the detectorist/s who found them, including the Staffordshire hoard, Vale of York hoard, etc.

...now even though archaeology played second fiddle to the latter discoveries, and they were fully unearthed from their original context, the detectorists are always mentioned and given a prominent place in written articles. Metal detecting was also rightly given its part, and funnily enough the archaeologists always say these finds were reported and unearthed in the correct manner?

...however, I did absolutely everything right and nothing wrong, yet feel victimised and maginalised by our Scottish system and those operating within it and for whatever reason. I am given only a cursory mention at the bottom of the press releases. I am never asked for quotes or allowed to see official press releases before they are sent out, despite asking and being told I  would be, yet I am always operating under the same embargo as everyone else - it would seem that I am not trusted, or more importantly not given any thought at all. Even my surname was spelled incorrectly within the most recent press release issued by the Crown Office, and there was a spelling mistake in the title of the release, or is the correct spelling of vessel... "vessell" - should I take this personally?

...so, we shall wait and see how they continue to play this saga, and perhaps someone, somewhere within these organisations will have some decency and moral fibre to do the right and proper thing with regards to myself and my place / role in the discovery of Scotland's greatest ever treasure!
« Last Edit: April 08, 2016, 09:19:10 PM by P0k3Rman »

Seagoon

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Re: ...a Scottish Viking in National Geographic
« Reply #22 on: March 29, 2016, 12:25:19 AM »
Finally catching up after a bit of a break...  All I can say is:  through superlative and out the other side mate!   O0 O0 O0 O0 O0   Careful how you de-orbit tho'!

alexio

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Re: ...a Scottish Viking in National Geographic
« Reply #23 on: March 29, 2016, 12:44:06 PM »
all i can say is wow!

well actually i can say a wee bit more than that, I wonder if the reason for the vessel being buried another 3 inches below the first hoard was to make people who found the first hoard thought that was it, so it might have had a clever security reason behind it.   
Hope they piece together more and more about it and give you all the credit you deserve Derek, fantastic lifetime discovery, thats you now a part of history yourself, well done!!

jock59

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Re: ...a Scottish Viking in National Geographic
« Reply #24 on: March 29, 2016, 03:40:10 PM »
All the excitement and publicity about Derek's fantastic find made me start to think, and this question is open to all. Over the years that various hoards ( Large or small) have been unearthed, is there any common denominator regarding the position of these hoards. What I mean is, are they buried close to landmarks ie large rocks,trees, rivers etc. to make it easier for the person(s) to re find their treasure otherwise I would guess they would make a map. A few of the finds I have watched on video etc appear to be in very flat open countryside. This may seem a very basic question but being a newbie hopefully I can be excused?!!
                                                                                                        John

chris3030

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Re: ...a Scottish Viking in National Geographic
« Reply #25 on: March 29, 2016, 04:07:14 PM »
all i can say is wow!

well actually i can say a wee bit more than that, I wonder if the reason for the vessel being buried another 3 inches below the first hoard was to make people who found the first hoard thought that was it, so it might have had a clever security reason behind it.   
Hope they piece together more and more about it and give you all the credit you deserve Derek, fantastic lifetime discovery, thats you now a part of history yourself, well done!!
Agreed it was hidden well seems like whoever hid  it had no plans to go back for it anytime soon.
Also the way it was carefully wrapped .I guess we will never know for sure .

P0k3Rman

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Re: ...a Scottish Viking in National Geographic
« Reply #26 on: April 08, 2016, 12:42:22 PM »
All the excitement and publicity about Derek's fantastic find made me start to think, and this question is open to all. Over the years that various hoards ( Large or small) have been unearthed, is there any common denominator regarding the position of these hoards. What I mean is, are they buried close to landmarks ie large rocks,trees, rivers etc. to make it easier for the person(s) to re find their treasure otherwise I would guess they would make a map. A few of the finds I have watched on video etc appear to be in very flat open countryside. This may seem a very basic question but being a newbie hopefully I can be excused?!!
                                                                                                        John

...having either found or been involved in the recovery of 10 hoards I can say that for the larger hoards there is most definitely a pattern and there are markers that can be understood and looked for if you go hoard hunting. However, I will only release this information in any book that I may publish at a later date - sorry, but I have given away a lot of information over the years on the forum and to individual members, but need to keep some surprises and the detail for publishing - got to get you all to buy it somehow  ;) ;D ;D ;D